Dispensing packet for waxed paper

Abstract

Claims

July 311, 1923. 1,463,593 w. B. COLLINS DISPENSING PACKET FOR WAXED PAPER Filed Nov. 20, 1922 WITNESS v 1 VENTOR. W 7 BY, ' ATTORNEY Patented Jul 3 E923. E, ggpg' WILLIAM B. COLLINS, OF BEN AVON BOROUGH, PENNSYLVANIA. nrsrnnsmo PACKET roe wanna rnrnn. Application filed November 20, 1922. Serial No. 602,114 I specification. My invention consists of a new and improved dispensing packet of waxed aper. Waxed paper is largely used by ousewives for many purposes, such as wrapping food stuffs. At the present time such paper is sold in the form of flat sheets stacked or piled one on the other, and then rolled about a tube, and the result is thatthe sheets readily become soiled, wrinkled and torn, making their use inconvenient and unsatisfactory, and resulting in a relatively large percentage of waste. The object which I have in view is the provision of a dispensing packet of waxed paper which will preservethe sheets in perfect and sanitary condition until used, and from which the sheets may be removed one at a time without disturbing or in any way injuring the sheets remainin in the packet. My improved packet is o the following characten, A pile or stack of the waxed sheets is doubled or folded along then inserted into a long narrow envelope having an 0 en end preferably provided with a-flap. 5 length of wire or cord, preferably wire, is then inserted through holes in the closed end of the envelope and through the registering ends of the sheets, and the ends of said wire or cord are then connected together to form a suspension loop, so that the envelope and its contents may be suspended from a nail or hook by means of said loop, with the open end of the envelope downward. In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1 is a view in perspective showing my packet v suspended from a nail, with the bottom end of the envelope open, and a human hand withdrawing a sheet of waxed aper from the bottom of the envelope; Fig. 2 IS an isometric view of the envelopewith the fiap of the open end turned in to close the envelope, and Fig. 3 is a broken plan view of a sheet removed from the packet. The following is a description of the drawings. its center line, and suspension 100 A represents an row shape, and flexible paper. One end, the upper end in the drawings, of the envelope is closed, while the other end is open and provided with a flap 1 which may be turned up into the envelope to close the same. B representsa plurality of sheets of waxed paper laid in a pile or stack, and then doubled or folded once upon itself. The folded pile of paper sheets is then inserted into the envelope until the inner ends of said sheets envelope, of long and narand made of a relatively thin substantially abut against the closed end of the envelope. A length of wire or cord, preferably wire, C, is inserted through holes 2 in the closed end of the envelopeA and in the adjacent ends of the sheets B, and the ends of the wire or cord are then connected together by twisting or knotti'ng to form aloop by which the packet is suspended as shown in Fig. 1. The flap 1 may and out as it does not the sheets in the envelope. When the consumer desires to use a sheet of the waxed paper, the hand is inserted into the'lower portion of the envelope and the outermost sheet, indicated at B in Fig. 1, is grasped and given a downward pull which tears the hole through to the top of the sheet as indicated at Fig. 3, thus releasing the sheet and allowing it to'be pulled down out of the envelope without disturbing the remaining sheets. The sheets may thus be removed one by one, or two or more at a time, until the entire supply of sheets is exhausted, and the now be pulled down function to support sheet last removed will be found to be asand attractive method of putting up'waxed paper for the market. It is also evident that the packet may be hungup on the wall of a kitchen, where it will be ready for immediate use, and will be meantime out of the way. What I desire to claim is 1. In a dispensing packet of sheets, the combination of an envelope with an opening at one end, a pile of sheets, said pile folded transversely and inserted into said envelope with free edges of the pile ad'acent the closed end of the envelope, an a for the packet extending Y through holes in the closed end ofthe enseid envelope with tree edges of the pile adjacent the closed end of the envelope, and to suspension loop for the packet extending through holes in the closed end of the envelope and through the corresponding por-. tion of the sheets; whereby the packet may he stored or transported with the flopped end of the envelope tucked in, and when hung up for use, the loop mey be hooked over e neil or other support with the flopped mes es end of the envelope helow end open'tor the downward Withdrawal of individual sheets. 3. In a dispensin pocket otwexed sheets, the combination 0% a relatively long and narrow envelope 7 with an opening at one end, at pile of Waxed sheets, said pile folded transversely and inserted into said envelope with free edges of the pile adjacent the closed end of the envelope, end at suspension loop for the packet extending through holes in the closed end of the envelope and through the corresponding portion of the waxed sheets. Signed at Pittsburgh, Fe, this 13th day of Now, 1922. I I WILLIAM B. CUIAIJINS.v

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